Great, Another Bootstrap Site

Paul Scrivens:

If you have done your time and learned design or coding, then frameworks offer you a great way to take some shortcuts, but only because you know how to tweak your way through them when things get rough. If you are using Bootstrap to quickly get a site out the door, I understand the importance of launching fast and early, but spend a couple of hours making sure your site doesn’t look like the thousand other Bootstrap sites out there.

Nailed it. Bootstrap is an incredible tool that is easily abused by those who see it as a theme. Don’t look at Bootstrap as a coat of paint to slap haphazardly onto your site. See it as a power sprayer that will let you blast through some of the solved problems of front-end code organization so you can focus on the details of the interface.

“These are “thought-leader gatherings” where “rock stars” emerge from their “silos” to learn about “disruptive” ideas that have been carefully “curated.” ”

— Benjamin Wallace, New York Magazine, on the proliferation of TED and similar conferences.

Cowboy Junkies Tiny Desk Concert (Taken with Instagram at NPR Headquarters)

Cowboy Junkies Tiny Desk Concert (Taken with Instagram at NPR Headquarters)

Tiny Desk Concerts with the Cranberries are very well attended, it turns out.

Tiny Desk Concerts with the Cranberries are very well attended, it turns out.

The packaging for Tycho’s “Dive” album is gorgeous, which I was completely unaware of having been introduced to the record through Rdio. Currently mourning the slow-moving death of album art at the hands of digital delivery.  (Taken with instagram)

The packaging for Tycho’s “Dive” album is gorgeous, which I was completely unaware of having been introduced to the record through Rdio. Currently mourning the slow-moving death of album art at the hands of digital delivery. (Taken with instagram)

“At the very least, Hitchens’s antireligious writings carried a whiff of something absent in many of atheism’s less talented apostles — a hint that he was not so much a disbeliever as a rebel, and that his atheism was mostly a political romantic’s attempt to pick a fight with the biggest Tyrant he could find.”

— Ross Douthat

(Source: The New York Times)

Really enjoyed Bill Frisell’s take on “Strawberry Fields” at today’s Tiny Desk Concert.

Really enjoyed Bill Frisell’s take on “Strawberry Fields” at today’s Tiny Desk Concert.

Fonts In Use: BostonGlobe.com

Stephen Coles:

Despite the emphasis on maintaining the newspaper’s identity, BostonGlobe.com is not merely a skeuomorphic replication of the printed paper. Font sizes, column widths, and navigation are informed by best practices in digital media, and specifically “responsive” design, resizing and repositioning text and images for optimal viewing at any window size. Not every window width results in a beautiful page, but overall it’s a much better and more consistent experience from the big screen to the iPhone than most digital newspapers today.

The calculus of brand consistency vs. page weight is critical in making decisions about typography on the web, particularly for a responsive site that will see significant mobile browser use.

This is as complex a case study as you’ll find on the subject, and the insight from Miranda Mulligan, Upstatement and Filament Group is invaluable.

Please let this not be the future of reading on the web

Rian van der Merwe:

As advertising clickthrough rates continue to drop, the ads become more desperate and invasive, and readers are starting to notice and do something about it. I’m doing the majority of my reading in RSS and Instapaper where I can read in peace without being pummeled by distractions.

The chorus decrying the exodus of readers to quiet alternative reading experiences is growing. My hope is that this exodus will serve as a wake-up call to publishers deluded in their belief that readers have an endless well of patience to endure intrusive advertising and cluttered pages.

Required reading for editorial experience designers.

(Source: daringfireball.net)

Responsive Advertising

Mark Boulton:

Recently at Mark Boulton Design, we’ve been working on a redesign of the global visual language for a large sports network. Like many web sites delivering news and editorial content, they rely on advertising for their revenue — either through multiple ad slots on the page, or from video pre-rolls.

Early on in the project, we discussed Responsive Web Design at length. From an editorial and product perspective, it makes perfect sense. Who wouldn’t want their content adapting to a device their reading it on? Who wants to pinch-zoom again and again? From a business and product perspective, we’ve seen this from multiple clients who want to take advantage of certain interactions on certain devices — swiping for example — for users to better engage with the content in a more native way. All good. And then advertising comes along and things get challenging.

There’s a lot of good thinking in this piece on a topic I’ve been wrestling with since the BostonGlobe.com design started making waves. For sites that rely on display ad revenue, I’m not sure responsive design solves more problems than it creates.

/via Al Shaw