City of Angels (Taken with Instagram at Griffith Observatory)

City of Angels (Taken with Instagram at Griffith Observatory)

Paper has been hyped to me by multiple extremely smart, extremely talented folks at NPR, but I remained skeptical given my utter uselessness with at least three other drawing apps I’ve tried on iPad so far.

I’ve come around after spending some time with it this afternoon. Paper removes the paralysis of choice Adobe Ideas gave me with infinite brush size and color combinations while retaining just enough stroke variations to effectively translate the travel of a Wacom Bamboo stylus into UI sketches that don’t make me feel like I am a total fraud.

If you’ve been frustrated by the results other iPad drawing apps have yielded, I highly recommend you give tablet sketching another try with Paper.

Paper has been hyped to me by multiple extremely smart, extremely talented folks at NPR, but I remained skeptical given my utter uselessness with at least three other drawing apps I’ve tried on iPad so far.

I’ve come around after spending some time with it this afternoon. Paper removes the paralysis of choice Adobe Ideas gave me with infinite brush size and color combinations while retaining just enough stroke variations to effectively translate the travel of a Wacom Bamboo stylus into UI sketches that don’t make me feel like I am a total fraud.

If you’ve been frustrated by the results other iPad drawing apps have yielded, I highly recommend you give tablet sketching another try with Paper.

“We are tempted to think that our little “sips” of online connection add up to a big gulp of real conversation. But they don’t.”

— Sherry Turkle, The New York Times

Stunning work and a fascinating look inside war photography.

timelightbox:

Photographer Ben Lowy discussed his work, which documents places including Haiti, Darfur, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya during times of conflict.

Serendipitous.  (Taken with Instagram at NPR Headquarters)

Serendipitous. (Taken with Instagram at NPR Headquarters)

“If the definition of “open” is “that which can be indexed and monetized by Google,” maybe we need a new word.”

Liz Gannes, AllThingsD

Was in the neighborhood. #obligatory (Taken with Instagram at The White House)

Was in the neighborhood. #obligatory (Taken with Instagram at The White House)

Nielsen is wrong on mobile

Josh Clark (emphasis mine):

Mobile isn’t just ‘mobile’. It’s also the couch, the kitchen, the three-hour layover, all places where we have time and attention to spare. 42 per cent of mobile users say they use it for entertainment when they’re bored. Those aren’t 10-second sessions. That means we shouldn’t design only for stunted sessions or limited use cases.

Say it over and over until you’ve exorcised the mental image of your user typing furiously on her iPhone as she frantically runs down a crowded sidewalk, looking for her next 10-second morsel of information. That user undoubtedly exists, but we have to stop assuming this is the only mobile use case.

Skeuomorphs? We don’t need no stinking skeuomorphs…

Propellerhead’s deceptively simple new music creation app Figure takes a very different tack than Apple’s GarageBand in its approach to synth UI. While there is much to appreciate in GarageBand’s expansive capabilities, I have often felt that the team erred on the side of aesthetics at the expense of usability. The primary offender in this category is their implementation of physical knob skeuomorphs, which are a constant source of frustration for me.

Figure, on the other hand, gives us subtle visual cues to the “knobs” controlling the rhythm of each piece of the drum machine without a dogmatic adherence to the physical behavior of a knob. The Figure knobs are delightfully simple to manipulate by dragging up and down, and the knob expands to make the rhythmic value visible while manipulating the control.

This is beautiful work that I hope Apple’s designers will take note of.

Skeuomorphs? We don’t need no stinking skeuomorphs…

Propellerhead’s deceptively simple new music creation app Figure takes a very different tack than Apple’s GarageBand in its approach to synth UI. While there is much to appreciate in GarageBand’s expansive capabilities, I have often felt that the team erred on the side of aesthetics at the expense of usability. The primary offender in this category is their implementation of physical knob skeuomorphs, which are a constant source of frustration for me.

Figure, on the other hand, gives us subtle visual cues to the “knobs” controlling the rhythm of each piece of the drum machine without a dogmatic adherence to the physical behavior of a knob. The Figure knobs are delightfully simple to manipulate by dragging up and down, and the knob expands to make the rhythmic value visible while manipulating the control.

This is beautiful work that I hope Apple’s designers will take note of.

NYC

NYC
Manhattan from the Brooklyn Bridge
NYC
Brooklyn Bridge
NYC
New York by Gehry
NYC
Tower reflection
NYC
Memorial
NYC
1 World Trade Center
NYC
Tower reflection II
NYC
30 Rock
NYC
30 Rock
NYC
Midtown mist